Desert Hot Springs teens perform anti-bullying skit at Two Bunch Palms

October 18th, 2013 | by Brett Kelman | Comments

If you’ve been glued to the headlines recently, you are probably overdue for a feel-good story about bullying.

Well, look no further than the Palm Springs Unified School District, where Desert Hot Springs students have taken a pre-emptive strike against bullies.

Twenty-one students from the Associated Student Government of the Desert Hot Springs Alternative Center performed an anti-bullying skit for students at Two Bunch Palms Elementary on Friday morning.

Mark Medina and the Desert Hot Springs Alternative Center ASB students show Two Bunch Palms students the number of children bullied each year (160,000) in this country. Photo Courtesy of Joan Boiko, PSUSD spokeswoman.

Mark Medina and the Desert Hot Springs Alternative Center ASB students show Two Bunch Palms students the number of children bullied each year (160,000) in this country. Photo Courtesy of Joan Boiko, PSUSD spokeswoman.

 

Bunch Palms Elementary students answer questions about what they learned during the anti-bullying presentation.

Bunch Palms Elementary students answer questions about what they learned during the anti-bullying presentation.

The skit was meant as a pro-active message about the perils of bullying, signs of becoming a bully and strategies for avoiding bullies.

“The younger students answered questions about what they learned and came away with the overarching message that everyone has a right to live, work and study free from bullying, harassment and violence and that no one asks to be bullied,” wrote Joan Boiko, spokeswoman for the Palm Springs Unified School District, in an e-mail.

As many as 160,000 are bullied in the United States each year, according to the school district. Most recently, bullying has made horrifying headlines in Florida, where two teenage girls have been arrested for bullying a classmate online, prodding her to commit suicide. The suspects were charged with felony stalking, and face possible jail time if convicted.

The prosecution of these girls shows a turning point in how law enforcement agencies are dealing with the growing problem of cyber bullying, according to this article by the Los Angeles Times, published on Thursday.

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