Sports

Kobe Bryant with Bill Clinton — a great message that could have been more

January 13th, 2014 | by Leighton Ginn | Comments

The ESPN Town Hall on Monday Night was a great event highlighted by a conversation between Kobe Bryant and Bill Clinton, moderated by ESPN personality Mike Greenberg.

Sometimes these things can be boring, but Bryant and Clinton were engaging, and Greenberg kept the conversation going.

As I was Tweeting, we got a lot of responses from many people who follow @MyDesertSports, mainly wondering if this was open to the public. You got the impression a large group of people were going to drop what they were doing to catch Bryant, who led the Los Angeles Lakers to five NBA titles.

To be fair, a few were die-hard Dodgers fan who wanted to do the same thing to catch Matt Kemp. Also part of the Town Hall was Olympic gold medal sprinter Allyson Felix, ex-NFL Pro-Bowler Herschel Walker and soccer superstar Julie Foudy.

It’s a real testiment to the strong panel the Clinton Foundation was able to assemble.

However, here’s the one criticism — it should have been open to the public.

Prior to the start, someone came up to my section asking if people wanted to move up front to fill some of the empty seats. My guess is there wouldn’t be a seat available if this was open to the public. That’s a real credit to what Kemp and Bryant mean to Southern California. (Keep that in mind Dodgers if you’re thinking of trading Kemp)

It’s a great message they were spreading about being more active by participating, as well as trying to make sports fun again.

I’m sure there were a lot of kids, and particularly a lot of parents, who would have come away learning something and hopefully changing their perspectives about sports.

However, the one good things is, ESPN will televise this Town Hall on Feb. 9 at 5 p.m. Hopefully a lot of parents and kids will tune in.

It was well worth it.

 

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